FBPM Coverage Protocol for PLW FBPM Coverage Protocol for PLW

 
Node 1. The PLW in this case is at risk. We are therefore checking whether PLW is in FBPM by asking her if she is in a specific nutrition programme. If PLW responds yes then we need to verify which programme this is. The verification can be done by either of two ways:

  • Ask PLW for a card or any other record from the programme in which she is admitted in; or,
  • Ask PLW for the treatment / food item / food supplement that she has been given by the programme.

For the first option, it would be good to have an idea of the different kinds of cards or forms (if any) that each of the different programmes are using and providing to their beneficiaries. With this knowledge, it would be quite straightforward to verify whether or not the PLW is in the right programme.

For the second option, it would be good to have an idea of the different kinds of food items / food supplement that is given by each of the different programme to their beneficiaries. With this knowledge, it would facilitate in confirming whether or not the PLW is in the right programme.

Node 2, Node 4 and Node 5. If PLW is assessed / verified as being in FBPM, the PLW is counted as covered by the FBPM. If PLW is in TSFP, the PLW is counted as recovering from MAM hence counted in TSFP. For PLW not in FBPM or is in any other programme other than FBPM or TSFP, PLW is counted as not covered by the FBPM.

Node 3. For all PLW, the SBCC coverage protocol should be applied.

Node 6. For PLW who are at risk who are not in FBPM, the barriers (OUT) questionnaire is administered. The barriers questionnaire elicits responses on reasons for non-attendance including knowledge and recognition of undernutrition and knowledge and awareness of the programme.

Node 7. For the PLW who are at risk and are in the FBPM, the cost-effectiveness questionnaire is administered. The cost-effectiveness questionnaire elicits from the respondents the cost they incur to be able to participate in the programme. The cost is estimated by asking the respondent how much time (in hours) they spend for every follow-up visit to and from the programme and by asking the respondent how much they can earn for an hour’s worth of labour. By multiplying the number of hours spent accessing the programme with the potential earnings they can gain from an hour’s worth of labour, we can arrive at a shadow cost which a mother or carer gives up every time they bring their child to the programme.